Self Worth – Opinions of others – What is your worth?

By: Heero Yuy

feynman-1981-2

I wasn’t much of a scientist or engineer but I found the stories of these great folks who were in those particular fields of study to be very fascinating. The man above is Richard Feynman and he is one of the most interesting Physicists I know. Feynman wrote an interesting book called Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman! (Adventures of a Curious Character). He leads you through all the ways he thinks about life as a Physicist and an inquisitive person. He doesn’t particularly care for what others think of him, particularly his grammar, and just does things for fun! Give the book a read if you haven’t done so already as it is a worthwhile adventure.

Feynman never for a moment doubted his own abilities or his insatiable desire to explore the world regardless of what his peers or contemporaries thought about him. His self worth is determined by the size of his imagination and appetite for adventure. Obviously, this eventually resulted in him taking on wild vacations by putting a finger on a spinning globe and getting a Nobel Prize in Physics in 1965. Guess it doesn’t hurt to be curious!

So, if Feynman can do it, so can you, right? Well… Not quite. Not to say you cannot get a Nobel Prize or have a lot of fun but you will never truly have fun if you live by the rules set by someone else and their definitions of attaining success. The following quote is widely associate to Albert Einstein. Regardless if that is true or not it is a good quote anyways:

“Everyone is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”

This is how most people judge their own self worth:

 

It’s easy to gauge social status and worth by titles assigned at big Corporations and Institutions, current dollar amount in our respective bank and brokerage account, number of ponies in the stable (cars in the garage), square footage of the house(s) that we own, boats (yachts) on the dock(s), and planes (jets) in the hanger(s). That is a good way to gauge our extrinsic value without really looking at our intrinsic value. Usually, by harnessing intrinsic talents we can acquire a lot of extrinsic knowledge and wealth (i.e. Elon Musk). Society easily judges based on extrinsic value because it is easier than to assess the individual intrinsic worth. It’s quicker to check the people on Forbes 100 list than to read entire auto/biographies of those very same people.

One way to understand intrinsic value is to read and understand others, both living and deceased, through various forms of media available. Ultimately, you will find a character like Feynman who is naturally curious and inquisitive about the outside world and himself. You will understand that smart and rich people worry about the same things as you and I and much more by understanding how they think. Once you internalized this knowledge and acted upon it in some reflection you too will find your own self worth as determined by your metrics.

My highschool Math teacher Mr.Ben Cook once told me that:

“If you are not having fun, you are doing something wrong!”

He’s an interesting character and reflecting on my own life I know he is right!